(First published at www.thelovesafetynet.com – this article is recommended for those already working through the steps in Back From the Looking Glass)

Looking for Love? Give Up the Unhealthy Dream . . .


Steve loves the story of Bluebeard and today I want to share with you why . . .

The ancient tale begins with Bluebeard, the richest man in town, living in his castle on the hill.

We then meet the young woman, and her sisters, whose hand Bluebeard sought in marriage . . .

The narrator explains these young women were not seduced by Bluebeard himself, but instead by the idea that their sister marrying him would cause all three to gain status and social superiority.

Right from the start all three sisters sensed something was not quite right about Bluebeard; after all his strange blue beard was there on his face right in front of them. Bluebeard’s wealth and prestige, however, caused them to ignore their initial instincts. 

Steve will often ask;

If you are with a narcissist, I wonder why you decided to ignore your instincts?”

If you are familiar with the tale, you will be aware that it was a truly horrendous situation Bluebeard’s young wife was walking into. In the the original version, however, which you can read in ‘Women who run with the wolves’, she earns a last minute reprieve at the end of the story.

In my opinion Bluebeard is a symbol of our unhealthy ego and this story about it’s destruction.

. . .

In our family’s personal story of Bluebeard, I now know that the unhealthy ego in our household was not just in Steve but also lived in me.

For example . . .  when I first met Steve; he was charming, the captain of the football team and had a wealthy and flamboyant father (who it turns out also was a narcissist). Right from the start, along with many other danger signs, my instincts should have seen Steve’s lack of compassion for me.

Instead, I wanted to believe the fairy tale romance my mind was constructing . . .  with myself in the starring role.

Can you see the unhealthy ego in this?

Because I didn’t want to let go of this dream (of us as the perfect couple and better than everyone else) after we were married I didn’t tell too many people that behind the scenes Steve was regularly rude and abusive towards myself and our children. I was ashamed, but preferred to blame myself that the dream had not materialised, rather than see it was unhealthy in the first place. 

Things didn’t improve for us until I let go of that dream . . .  and this took a lot of grieving.

I didn’t, however,  throw the baby out with the bath water; letting go of the dream didn’t involve leaving Steve behind.

I had already seen too many people throw their marriage away for another ‘roll of the dice’, kidding themselves their prince would come along ‘next time’; but because the unhealthy dream was still there, end up in the same situation all over.*

Instead I let go of wanting to be a princess carried off by my prince and decided I would need to face the fact Steve and I were both broken and in need of help. Even more important was that I had to accept it would need to be me (and not some knight in shining armour) who would lead us both out of the mess we had found ourselves in.

I decided to stop waiting for a hero and to become my own hero instead.

But what are heroes really made of?

. . .

In terms of social acceptability our problem was not small and very embarrassing to admit. The problem, however, was not going away without me admitting we needed help and accepting that help from whoever would offer it.

Asking for this help from community services, the police (and police social workers) took finding humility in myself as much as courage.

It squarely forced me face the fact that really I was no better than anyone.

But I also resisted crying victim.  

Instead I learned to face facts that an honest relationship takes discipline and hard work. Raising children especially. A good marriage is both challenging and rewarding but takes dedication, selflessness, patience and humility.

These qualities in a person do not come from a desire to be better than other people. Like exercise, prayer or meditation, they are disciplines and practices requiring physical acts that must be performed over and over.

. . .

Are you stilling clinging to a fantasised reality of who your partner is and what they are really capable of?

I was blaming Steve for all our problems, while also expecting him to be my hero; seeing him as a monster for his lack of concern for us while also demanding he be our saviour.

This of course was ridiculous.

Steve’s immaturity and irresponsibility may have been hurting us, but monster? No. Just a damaged human being (and I had my gaps too) with no way of knowing how to be the hero I was demanding him to be.

After years of grief,  finally I accepted that I was going to have to drop my unrealistic expectations.

I saw that I was going to have to stop complaining and get in and roll up my sleeves and do loads of dirty work that previously I had been avoiding. Like finding some work, sorting out our finances and finding the strength to walk away from the fights and put more love and time into the care of our children.

Once Steve saw me;

  1. Get in and do the tough stuff and not take any more childishness from him.
  2. Stop asking him to be the big hero he was pretending to be with others (but deep down we both really knew he was not). 
  3. Stop asking him to take care of my negative emotions.
  4. Reassure him that I was not going to abandon him.

Slowly he began to see he was safe with me.  

When I stopped needing him to be the fantasy, dropping his defences and being honest and real became easier. 

No more castle in the sky. Just me, Steve and the kids putting one foot in front of the other.

 . . .

Are you still hanging on to the dream of a life where in some way you are superior to others? Are you asking your NPD partner to support you in ways they are simply not equipped for?

Ask yourself these questions honestly.

If you are the partner of someone with narcissistic tendencies you need to see that there is not just unhealthy ego in your partner, but most likely these tendencies reside in you also.

If not I wonder if you would have fallen so hard for this person in the first place or held on so tight after you discovered the other side to their personality?

Please let go of the unhealthy dream and don’t walk into Bluebeard’s castle again.

. . .

Steve and I might not be royalty on the hill (with a dirty secret) any more, but we are a great success story recovering from a problem which could have destroyed our family or left us just plain bitter.

I have compassion for those who have not fared as well as we have but I am also proud of that success, and because it has been earned, feel this pride is healthy. 

Humility gives us strength.

Kim Cooper  🙂

PS. If you want the same results I achieved, you better roll up your sleeves and be prepared to give this all you’ve got, because I can assure you they will not lay down their pride without you proving you are stronger than they are!

* Of course you may decide the person you are with is not worth the effort I put in . . .  but whether you stick together or not, if you truly want the pain and the conflict in your marriage to end, you will need to tackle the parts of yourself that wants to be better than other people and seeks privilege and entitlement through a partner. If not, changing partners won’t help. These tendencies in yourself will lead straight back to the dungeon in Bluebeard’s castle.

This Post Has 8 Comments
  1. Recognizing that I have been expecting my husband to be the person he pretends to be on the outside (which is also who he wants to be) and that he can’t yet be this person has been challenging … and an ongoing process. Recognizing how I have allowed him to blame his failure to achieve this ideal on me has been even more empowering.
    Thanks for years of assistance .
    Maria

  2. Thanks for sharing that example and yes,I am in an unhealthy marriage but, I don’t want to give up on it either. I need to give up on the idea of a fairytale marriage and fix me and work on fixing us.

  3. Hi Kim and Steve

    What a brilliant encapsulation of this problem.

    You’ve helped me so much.

    The way to holiness? Humility, humility, humility.

    Let’s pray for each other and bless those who we can’t get along with due to long term prejudice (both ways, sadly) and too much hurt (my siblings).

    May God bless them as they are!!
    May God continue to bless you both too, and all your family. xo

  4. Thanks for sharing this. It shines a light on questions I have had growing up and even now within my marriage. You validated some things for me.

  5. I completely agree with the message in this article. I think I truly “gave up the dream” a couple of years ago. It was a point where we were at a crossroads and truly had to make a decision to make this work or call it quits. I don’t know if he gave up his own dream of me becoming someone I was not, but I know I did in order to see myself through my commitment to my marriage and family. I began my process with grieving, just as you described. I was letting go of a little girl’s dream and forcing myself not to be jealous of those I knew who “supposedly” gotten their dream. I was in it because of my love for my husband and someone else’s dream was not part of that agreement. There have still been many ups and downs, but I truly believe things took a strong turning point at that time. I found this site earlier this year and I’m learning leaps and bounds. Thank you.

  6. “Fairy tales” are treasured classics for a reason, (and a very good one), but what the ubiquitous Disney franchise has done with them, in our “modern times”, is something almost no one can escape being influenced by,… When I was a child, a Disney movie came out very infrequently, and could only be viewed, when offered, in a movie theater,… so, compared to all the rest of our rather “regular, normally earthbound and practical, daily lives”, these out-sized fantasy experiences, were indeed rare “full-technicolor” extravaganzas ~ enjoyed immensely, looked forward to, yes idealized and dreamed about to an extent (the impressionable human ego and imaginary fantasy-life being what it is!), transported us to “another world” we could “live and believe in” for those moments, BUT the daily grind, including walking to school in all kinds of weather, homework, chores, even boredom, etc, was the basis of our “existence” 24/7/365,…

    what a different story these days!,… most kids can watch these videos over and over, interchangeably, 24/7/365,… and in the comfort of their own homes,… they have become an accepted part of life, and children can’t really tell the difference between the two,… so much “glossy romanticism” surrounds us, that we become easily seduced by its aura and “beauty” and charm and subliminal messages,… but too often a healthy sense of reality is lost, replaced by something unlivable,…

    so, how to readjust and deprogram and reprogram ourselves for a more functional and realistic way of living life?,… truly a grand project and “real cultural need”,… I recommend Kim’s advice and examples very enthusiastically,… that, and/or living on a small family run dairy farm, out in the boonies, for a few years!

    1. Hey Georgie, You have really understood the point of this story. I do not mean to trivialise the reality of living with someone with narcissistic tendencies, just make sure we are careful to see how this cultural sickness can seep into our lives as well. Just as men are seduced by James Bond type adventure movies, being made to feel that being home with their family is boring and beneath them, many women are still longing for an adoring prince who will be at their emotional beck and call.

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